PRINTING A BOOK AT VERONA IN 1622, THE ACCOUNT BOOK OF FRANCESCO CALZO LARI. Conor Fahy.

PRINTING A BOOK AT VERONA IN 1622, THE ACCOUNT BOOK OF FRANCESCO CALZO LARI.

Edited with an Introduction by Conor Fahy.

  • Paris: Fondation Custodia, 1993.
  • 8vo.
  • cloth, dust jacket.
  • (8), 171, (25) pages.

Price: $75.00  other currencies

Order Nr. 44058

This book is an account of the production details concerning the printing and distribution of the Musaeum Francisci Calceolarii, a large illustrated volume containing a Latin description by two Veronese doctors, Benedetto Ceruti and Andrea Chiocco, of some of the Calzolari family's natural history collection. The Musaeum was published in 1622 with 800 folio pages and 45 line engravings and is described as the most complex and ambitious piece of book production to emerge from the small Veronese printing industry in the first 30 years of the 17th century. This account book that describes the Calzolari collection is an important and fascinating document of the early Italian printing industry. It provides a unique general view, from the inside, of the preparation, printing and distribution of a substantial volume, produced in one of the many provincial centres of Italian printing. By the seventeenth century, Italy was no longer at the cutting edge of development in European printing, but its historic role as a centre of cultural and artistic pre-eminence had endowed it with a wealth of material which still permitted original initiatives, like the Musaeum. The Musaeum is a large folio volume with numerous line engravings. This account book has been transcribed by Conor Fahy, a leading authority on Italian printing, and is here published for the first time with a lengthy introduction. The volume also contains a photographic reproduction of the Musaeum, an Italian-English glossary, and extensive appendices and indices. This book was chosen by the American Institute of Graphic Arts as one of the Fifty Books of 1993, has been printed and bound by the Stinehour Press of Lunenberg, Vermont, and contains 58 plates.