Three etchings by John Sloan for the series of etchings entitled Westminster Abbey
Three etchings by John Sloan for the series of etchings entitled Westminster Abbey

Three etchings by John Sloan for the series of etchings entitled Westminster Abbey.

(Newton, A. Edward).
  • N.P. n.p., 1891.
  • broadsides.

Price: $2,150.00  other currencies

Order Nr. 108953

John Sloan (1871-1951) was forced to drop out of school at the age of 16 due to the mental breakdown of his father. He got a job as a cashier at Porter and Coates, a local stationery store where he met A. Edward Newton, a fellow employee. When Newton established his own stationery business in 1890, he hired Sloan. Sloan designed greeting cards and calendars, and etchings which were used in various gift books published by Newton. Peter Morse, in his catalogue of Sloan prints, describes one of John Sloan's earliest efforts as this Westminster Series of 13 etchings and provides great detail, noting that only one complete surviving example of the booklet and etchings has survived to his knowledge which is held by The Philadelphia Museum of Art. The Delaware Art Museum holds signed copies of the etchings through the kind donation of Helen Farr Sloan. Any of these early Sloan works are extremely scarce. We have the following three etchings from this series:
Morse 13. The West Front.
Morse 17. Saint Erasmus' Doorway.
Morse 21. The Poets Corner.
Morse notes that A. Edward Newton's name does not appear anywhere in the booklet or on the etchings, but assigns them to Newton on their similarity to other projects executed by Sloan for Newton.
The three etchings have been removed from an older framing (By Schneider Art Galleries of Seattle) and measure 7 5/8 x 5 7/8 inches with the etching itself varying in size. There are remnants of glue along the top edge of the white outer border where they were mounted and framed. The margins of the outer border are foxed and stained in places. One etching has notes in pencil beneath the etching giving instructions to the framer. The etchings themselves are well preserved.