THE BIBLE AS BOOK: THE SERIES. Van Kampen.
THE BIBLE AS BOOK: THE SERIES.
THE BIBLE AS BOOK: THE SERIES.
THE BIBLE AS BOOK: THE SERIES.
THE BIBLE AS BOOK: THE SERIES.
THE BIBLE AS BOOK: THE SERIES.
THE BIBLE AS BOOK: THE SERIES.
THE BIBLE AS BOOK: THE SERIES.
THE BIBLE AS BOOK: THE SERIES.
THE BIBLE AS BOOK: THE SERIES.
THE BIBLE AS BOOK: THE SERIES.
THE BIBLE AS BOOK: THE SERIES.
THE BIBLE AS BOOK: THE SERIES.
THE BIBLE AS BOOK: THE SERIES.

THE BIBLE AS BOOK: THE SERIES.

(Bibles).

5 volumes.

  • New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Press, 1998-2003.
  • Large 8vo.
  • cloth, dust jackets
  • 1,256 pages
  • ISBN: 1584561114
  • ISBN: 9781584561118

Price: $250.00  other currencies

Order Nr. 73493

The Bible As Book, a five-title series (all five titles are in fine condition), is based on leading biblical scholars from different disciplines brought together to present their findings at conferences held by the The Scriptorium: Center for Christian Antiquities. The entire series was published from 1997-2003. Each title in the series studies a different period of time as the Bible was either being formed or printed. The first title,The Manuscript Tradition, edited by John L. Sharpe III and Kimberly Van Kampen, is chronologically and culturally vast and begins with an examination of the methodology of the scribes who produced the Dead Sea Scrolls. It concludes with new evidence for the propagation of the Scriptures some fifteen centuries later, at the dawn of the age of printing. The second title, The First Printed Editions, edited by Kimberly Van Kampen and Paul Saenger, investigates the history of the Bible between 1455 and 1520. This series of scholarly essays explores the early printing on the text, format and uses of the Bible. The third title, The Reformation, edited by Orlaith O'Sullivan, brings together twelve essays which examine the complex history of the Bible during this equally complex period. Each contributor attempts to answer some of the most pressing questions in Reformation biblical studies, such as: How did religious leaders help shape the readings of those lay people who were able to read the Bible in their own language for the first time? How did the clergy control and suppress heretical musing in the increasing number of annotated editions? Where was the editio princeps of the English Bible printed? Can modernity read the Renaissance Bible? What role did illustrations in Bibles play in the spread of Protestantism? The fourth title, The Hebrew Bible and the Judaean Desert Discoveries, edited by Edward D. Herbert and Emanuel Tov, charts the extraordinary developments witnessed over the last fifty years, since the chance discovery in 1947 of biblical scrolls in a cave in the vicinity of the Dead Sea. The biblical scholars chart the findings and controversies sparked off by the discovery and publication of some 900 scrolls which have transformed our understanding of the state of the biblical text at the turn of the last millennium. The fifth and final title, The Transmission of the Greek Text, edited by Scot McKendrick and Orlaith O'Sullivan, covers a wide range of topics that reflect on the science and the art of the textual criticism of the Greek Bible. The subjects covered include: the relationship between Jewish scribal culture and early Christian literary practices; Greek biblical texts uncovered in the Judaean Desert; the New Testament miniscule tradition; and New Testament biblical papyri. Fresh studies are presented of Codex Sinaiticus, Codex Bezae, and Codex Alexandrinus. From the use of the Church Fathers in New Testament criticism to the work of Eberhard Nestle in the nineteenth century, this volume holds something for everyone.