BEYOND MIDNIGHT: PAUL REVERE. Nan Wolverton, Lauren B. Hewes, curators.
BEYOND MIDNIGHT: PAUL REVERE
BEYOND MIDNIGHT: PAUL REVERE
BEYOND MIDNIGHT: PAUL REVERE
BEYOND MIDNIGHT: PAUL REVERE
BEYOND MIDNIGHT: PAUL REVERE
BEYOND MIDNIGHT: PAUL REVERE

BEYOND MIDNIGHT: PAUL REVERE.

  • Worcester, MA: American Antiquarian Society, 2019.
  • 8.5 x 10 inches
  • Paperback
  • 101 pages
  • ISBN: 9780692967119

Price: $29.99  other currencies

Order Nr. 134053

The Revolutionary War patriot Paul Revere (1734-1818) was immortalized in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's 1860 poem, "Paul Revere's Ride" with the famous opening lines: "Listen, my children, and you shall hear of the midnight ride of Paul Revere." But Revere was famous for so much more than his midnight ride. This exhibition and catalogue by the American Antiquarian Society (AAS), Beyond Midnight: Paul Revere, highlight the artisanship and entrepreneurial expertise of this iconic figure of the American Revolution.

The exhibition is on display at the New-York Historical Society from September 6, 2019 to January 12, 2020. In Massachusetts, the exhibition will be split and displayed simultaneously at the Concord Museum and the Worcester Art Museum from February 14 to June 7, 2020 and then will travel to Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas from July 1 to October 11. Beyond Midnight is co-curated by Nan Wolverton and Lauren B. Hewes, and it draws on the unparalleled AAS holdings of prints and books, including a near complete collection of Revere's works on paper.

The exhibition features nearly 200 items -- most made by Revere -- from rare prints to elegant silver tea services and period newspapers. Revere's skills as a printmaker can be seen in copper plate engravings depicting various events in Boston before and during the American Revolution including a 1766 image of an obelisk (or pyramid) built by the Sons of Liberty to celebrate the repeal of the Stamp Act, an image of British troops arriving to occupy Boston and -- perhaps the most famous image of political propaganda in American history -- his engraving of the Boston Massacre.

This full color, illustrated catalog features five essays exploring different aspects of Revere's work and career. Robert Martello in "Paul Revere: Patriot Manufacturer" describes how Revere grew his business. Jennifer L. Anderson's "Paul Revere and Sourcing Silver in Early America," explores the scarcity of precious metals in colonial America. Nancy Siegel explores Revere's engraved works on paper in her essay, "The Work of Art and the Art of Work: Prints and Ephemera by Paul Revere." Nan Wolverton explores how Revere used images of American Indians in her essay "'Borrowed . . . for the Use and Service of the Colony': Paul Revere's Native American Imagery." Lauren Hewes relates how the reprinting of Revere's Bloody Massacre in the 1830s began the re-emergence of Revere as a prototypical early American patriot in her essay "Rediscovering Revere: William Stratton's Facsimile of the Bloody Massacre." The catalog is edited by Hewes and Wolverton and designed by AAS graphic designer, Jaclyn Donovan Penny.