Damaged Copy

NINETEENTH-CENTURY DUST-JACKETS.

  • New Castle, Delaware and Pinner, Middlesex, England: Oak Knoll Press & Private Libraries Association, 2016.
  • 7.17 x 10.75
  • cloth, dust jacket
  • 216 pages.
  • ISBN: 9781584563471

Price: $60.00 save 50% $30.00  other currencies

Order Nr. 129220

"Godburn's book is a key contribution to our understanding of not only the dust jackets themselves, but also the individuals, institutions, and economic currents that created them, and is deserving of a place in any bookseller's reference library."
-- Laura Massey, ABA Newsletter

Nineteenth-Century Dust-Jackets
is a comprehensive general history of publishers' dust jackets during the first century of their use. From the earliest known jacket issued in 1819, the author surveys the entire field of British, American and European jackets and documents a part of publishing history that was nearly lost to the nineteenth-century custom of discarding dust-jackets so that the more decorative bindings could be seen. The book examines when and why publishers began to issue dust-jackets, the subsequent growth of their use, and the role they played in marketing.

Included are the rare all-enclosing jackets that were issued on some annuals and trade books, ornate Victorian jackets, binders' and stationers' jackets, and many others. A chapter on Lewis Carroll's jackets includes letters he wrote to his publisher on the subject, which are published here for the first time.

The appendices list all known jackets to 1870 and examine the John Murray and Smith, Elder archive which contains over 200 nineteenth-century jackets. There is a supporting bibliography, notes and index, and over 100 photographs in color, many never before seen.

Mark Godburn is a bookseller and collector who has written widely about the evolution of the dust-jacket in the nineteenth century. His research has brought to light many previously unrecorded examples, including the earliest jackets now known.

Corners bumped.

NINETEENTH-CENTURY DUST-JACKETS. Mark Godburn.