Table of Contents

THE GREAT LIBRARIES: FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE RENAISSANCE. Konstantinos Sp m. Staikos

THE GREAT LIBRARIES: FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE RENAISSANCE.

New Castle, Delaware: Oak Knoll Press, 2000. 9.5 x 13 inches. hardcover, dust jacket. 600 pages. First edition in English, second impression. This monumental work chronicles the development of the library from 300 B.C. to 1600 A.D. Beginning with the clay-tablet libraries of the ancient Sumerian and Assyro-Babylonian empires, to those inspired by the Italian Renaissance, Mr. Staikos reveals the majesty of Western literature within these great depositories of human knowledge. Using over 400 illustrations..... READ MORE

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Table of contents

                                     CONTENTS

Foreword by the Publisher                                                      i
Preface by Hélène Ahrweiler                                                iii-v
Author's Introduction                                                     vii-ix
Acknowledgements                                                              xi
Methodology                                                                  xii

                         BOOK ONE: CHAPTERS ONE TO ELEVEN

CHAPTER ONE. THE PEOPLES OF MESOPOTAMIA                                     3-17
I. The Sumerians                                                             3-9
    1. The first schools and the first school libraries                      4-6
    2. The first public record offices                                       6-7
    3. The Epic of Gilgamesh                                                 7-8
II. The age of Hammurabi                                                    8-12
    1. Public record offices and literary libraries                         9-11
    2. How the tablets were classified and arranged                        11-12
    3. The first library catalogue                                            12
III. Assurbanipal's library                                                12-16
    1. What the library contained                                             13
    2. The royal scribes                                                   13-16

CHAPTER TWO. EGYPT                                                         19-27
From the Pharaohs to the Ptolemies
    1. The papyrus roll                                                    19-20
    2. Egyptian writing: Hieroglyphics                                     20-21
    3. The Book of the Dead                                                21-23
    4. Popular reading matter                                              23-26
        (a) Subject matter                                                 23-25
        (b) Readership                                                     25-26
    5. Libraries                                                           26-27

CHAPTER THREE. THE HELLENIC WORLD                                          29-55
From the Pre-Socratics to the end of the Classical period
I. The Pre-Socratic period                                                 29-31
    1. Public libraries                                                    29-30
    2. The first private collections                                       30-31
II. The Classical period                                                   31-55
    1. How the sophists helped to popularize books                         33-37
    2. Private libraries                                                   37-41
    3. The book trade in the Hellenic world                                41-43
    4. Aristotle                                                           43-45
    5. The eventful subsequent history of Aristotle's library              45-49
    6. What books were made of                                             49-52
    7. Library architecture                                                52-55

CHAPTER FOUR. THE HELLENISTIC PERIOD
    THE GREAT LIBRARY OF ALEXANDRIA                                        57-89
    1. The foundation of the Museum                                        60-63
    2. The Library                                                         63-66
    3. The directors of the Library                                        66-69
        (a) Arrangement by literary genre                                  67-68
        (b) Architectural layout                                              68
    4. The Library's stock of books                                        69-74
    5. The destruction of the Library                                      74-80
    6. A chronicle of the Library's history                                80-81
    7. Postscript                                                          88-89

CHAPTER FIVE. OTHER LIBRARIES IN THE HELLENISTIC PERIOD                    91-96
I. Pergamum                                                                91-94
    1. The foundation of the library                                       91-92
    2. The library at its zenith                                              92
    3. Expansion of the library                                            92-93
    4. The problem of pseudepigraphy                                       93-94
    5. Architecture                                                           94
II. Ai Khanoum                                                             94-96

CHAPTER SIX. LIBRARIES IN THE ROMAN PERIOD                                97-121
I. The world of Latium                                                    97-109
    1. The beginnings of Roman literature                                 97-100
    2. The first libraries                                               100-101
    3. Education                                                         101-102
    4. Private libraries                                                 102-104
    5. Authors and public recitation                                     104-105
    6. Promotion of books by their authors                                   105
    7. Relations between author and publisher                                105
    8. Publishers                                                        105-106
    9. The antiquarian value of old books                                    106
    10. Booksellers                                                      106-109
II. Public libraries                                                     110-121
    1. Pollio's library                                                      110
    2. Augustus's library (the Palatine Library)                         110-111
    3. Tiberius's library                                                    111
    4. Vespasian's library                                                   111
    5. Trajan's library                                                  111-112
III. Architecture                                                        112-121
    1. Pollio's library                                                  112-113
    2. Augustus's library                                                113-114
    3. The Library of the Temple of Peace                                    114
    4. The Bibliotheca Ulpia                                                 114
    5. Libraries in bath-houses                                          116-117
    6. Private libraries                                                 117-120

CHAPTER SEVEN. LIBRARIES IN THE ROMAN PROVINCES                          123-130
I. The library of Pantaenus                                                  123
II. Hadrian as a patron of art and learning                              123-130
    1. Hadrian's library in Athens                                           125
    2. Hadrian's library at Tibur                                        125-130

CHAPTER EIGHT. THE EARLY CHRISTIAN WORLD                                 131-134
I. The first Christian libraries                                         131-134
    1. Parish libraries                                                      132
    2. Private libraries                                                 132-133
II. Architecture                                                         133-134

CHAPTER NINE. BYZANTlUM                                                  137-187
I. From Constantine to early Byzantine humanism                          140-154
    1. The first 'imperial' library                                      141-143
    2. Education                                                             143
    3. The crisis in the sixth century: from Justinian I to Leo IV       143-146
    4. Monasticism and monastic libraries                                146-149
    5. Private libraries                                                 149-153
    6. Booksellers                                                       153-154
    7. The changeover to lower-case script                                   154
II. Byzantine humanism in the ninth century                              154-165
    1. Three humanistic libraries                                        154-162
    2. Monasteries and centres of monasticism                            162-164
    3. A general library in the imperial palace.                         164-165
III. From Constantine VII to the capture of Constantinople
     by the Crusaders                                                    165-167
IV. The Empire of Nicaea                                                 167-170
    1. Higher education: Nikephoros Blemmydes                            168-169
    2. Theodore II Laskaris                                              169-170
V. The last Byzantine renaissance: from 1261 to 1453                     170-182
    1. The shortage of parchment                                         170-172
    2. Libraries of the literati                                         172-175
    3. University libraries                                              175-177
    4. Byzantine libraries in the West: from 1400 to 1453                177-182
VI. Architecture                                                         182-187
    1. Secular libraries                                                 182-184
    2. Monastic libraries                                                184-186

CHAPTER TEN. THE MIDDLE AGES                                             189-212
I. The Dark Ages                                                         190-198
    1. Book production in the Late Roman period                          190-192
    2. The Greek world at the service of monastic learning:
       The Vivarium                                                      192-196
    3. Schools in the Middle Ages                                            196
    4. The decline of Latin scholarship                                  196-197
    5. The Celtic and Anglo-Saxon worlds                                 197-198
II. The Carolingian renaissance                                          202-205
    1. Alcuin: Educational reforms and the revival of libraries          202-203
    2. Libraries during the Carolingian renaissance                      203-205
III. Books and libraries at the universities                             205-212
    1. The foundation of the first universities                          205-209
    2. The pecia system                                                  209-210
    3. University libraries                                              210-212

CHAPTER ELEVEN. THE RENAISSANCE                                          215-238
I. Humanism                                                              215-226
    1. The first humanist libraries. Lovati and his circle               215-218
    2. The revival of the bilingual library                              218-221
    3. Court libraries                                                   221-224
    4. Academies and scriptoria                                          224-226
II. The achievements of the early printers                               226-235
    1. Humanist presses                                                  229-232
    2. The impact of printed books on the growth of libraries            232-235
III. Architecture                                                        235-238
    1. Three-aisled libraries                                            236-237
    2. Libraries with painted decoration                                 237-238

BOOK TWO: CHAPTERS TWELVE TO TWENTY-FIVE
Ch. 12. The Library of the Oecumenical Patriarchate                      244-265
Ch. 13. The Library of the Monastery of St. John on Patmos               266-283
Ch. 14. The Vatican Library                                              284-303
Ch. 15. The Biblioteca Malatestiana at Cesena                            304-319
Ch. 16. The Biblioteca Marciana                                          320-337
Ch. 17. The Biblioteca Laurenziana                                       338-357
Ch. 18. The St. Gall Library                                             358-377
Ch. 19. The Library of Beatus Rhenanus at Selestat                       378-391
Ch. 20. The Herzog August Library at Wolfenbiittel                       392-407
Ch. 21. The Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris                              408-427
Ch. 22. The Nationalbibliothek in Vienna                                 428-445
Ch. 23. The Corvinian Library                                            446-463
Ch. 24. The Library of Strahov Abbey                                     464-483
Ch. 25. The Bodleian Library                                             484-501

ABBREVIATIONS                                                            503-504
BIBLIOGRAPHY                                                             507-539
INDEX                                                                    543-563