Book Excerpt

THE RESTORATION OF LEATHER BINDINGS. Bernard C. Middleton.
(Bookbinding).

THE RESTORATION OF LEATHER BINDINGS.

New Castle, Delaware: Oak Knoll Press, 2011. small 4to. cloth, dust jacket. xvi, 309 pages + 8 color plate pages. Fourth edition, revised and expanded from the 1998 edition. A welcome new addition in this book is a full-color section for the identification of leather and marbled papers. From the author of A History of English Craft Bookbinding Technique, this classic in the field of bookbinding is a practical guide to the restoration of leather... READ MORE

Price: $45.00 save 25% $33.75  other currencies  Order nr. 75328

Much has changed in the field of binding restoration since this book first appeared in 1972. Substances have been introduced which aid the lifting of deteriorated leather from tight backs, changes in the tanning and treatment of leather are proposed, new suppliers of materials have emerged and others have changed address, and new books and periodicals have appeared, so the text has been brought up to date to the best of the author's ability. Many restoration techniques are now dealt with in greater detail and a new chapter on the rebinding of antiquarian books, with information on the fitting of clasps, has been added, together with a section on the treatment of vellum bindings, in the hope of increasing the usefulness of the book. Details of very recent advances in the manufacture of longer-lasting leather and in the treatment of deteriorating leather have also been summarized.

For bringing to my notice various errors and omissions in the first edition I am greatly indebted to Paul Banks, Sydney M. Cockerell, Edgar Mansfield, and Roger Powell. My thanks are due to Marianne Tidcombe for compiling the index, also for reading the typescript of the new chapter in the present edition, and for making constructive suggestions for its improvement. My thanks go to Nicolas Barker, Roy Russell, and Mirjam M. Foot of the British Library, and to Betty M. Haines of the British Leather Manufacturers' Research Association for their cheerful co-operation, and to Vanessa Marshall for drawing my attention to the use of Lewiscraft Leather Cement. I am grateful to the British Library Board for permission to reproduce the photograph of the bindings of the Codex Sinaiticus, and to The Board of Trinity College, Dublin, for allowing me to reproduce the photograph of one of the bindings of the Book of Kells. The photographs were kindly sup- plied by Sydney M. Cockerell and Roger Powell respectively. Finally, I would like to thank my editor, Mary Huchting, for her ever-courteous vigilance and helpfulness.